3 Reasons You Should Develop Dynamic Thank Yous

This week I’m excited to have Sean Kirby, a grant writer, here on the blog to talk to you about developing dynamic thank yous. Sean Kirby (@seanmkirby) is a grant writer and blogger who lives in Buffalo, New York. He focuses on helping nonprofits and municipalities gain funding through dedicated research and compelling copy. When he’s not working, he enjoys rooting on Buffalo and Cleveland sports teams and trying new restaurants around Buffalo. You can find more about Sean at his website: www.seanmkirby.com.

3 Reasons You Should Develop Dynamic Thank Yous

So, you’ve converted four new donors and gotten two volunteer sign ups in the past week. You deserve to treat yourself for this newfound success!

Before you do, though, make sure you handle one more piece of important business: thanking people for getting involved with your nonprofit (with more than just a static “Thank You” page on your website). Here are 3 reasons why developing memorable thank yous should be a crucial part of your nonprofit’s communications strategy.

1. Start Building a Relationship.

Many nonprofits only send thank you letters to donors who have given above a certain threshold. This approach leaves out many donors (numbers show as high as 75%) who are only putting forth a small donation initially. They want to see how you treat them and where their donation goes before making a larger commitment. A first-time gift of any amount is the beginning of a relationship. Acknowledge that relationship and nurture it.

2. Increase Donor Engagement.

Obviously, you want your donors to continue making monetary contributions to your nonprofit. But you don’t want them to feel like an ATM. In your thank you letter, provide donors with an actionable item that allows them to see more of your organization on their terms. Invite them to volunteer for an event or sign up for your newsletter to receive the latest information.

3. Show Donor Impact.





Give donors a glimpse into your organization and explain the specific project or program their gift will help fund. Bonus points if you can work in a thank you from someone who will benefit directly from the donation! This strategy also ties into the previous point about increasing donor engagement. It also enhances your credibility and assures the donor that their money won’t be lost.

Taking the time to develop sincere, personal, well-crafted thank you letters is worth almost as much—if not more—than a donor’s contribution.

 

About the Author

Sean Kirby (@seanmkirby) is a grant writer and blogger who lives in Buffalo, New York. He focuses on helping nonprofits and municipalities gain funding through dedicated research and compelling copy. When he’s not working, he enjoys rooting on Buffalo and Cleveland sports teams and trying new restaurants around Buffalo. You can find more about Sean at his website: www.seanmkirby.com.

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